Archive for January, 2014

Writing Memoirs in 5th Grade

Written by admin. Posted in 5th Grade

In fifth grade, we are writing memoirs.  Fancy that!  Memoirs are similar to autobiographies in that they are written by the person that the memoir is about.  However, unlike autobiographies that typically span the full timeline of one´s life, a memoir may only focus in on one aspect, or theme.  Some students are writing memoirs about people, places, or objects that are of great personal importance, while others are writing about a particular sentiment or thought (i.e. live life to the fullest) that bears personal significance.

You can support your child at home by reading published memoirs together.  This website from Scholastic has loads of links to memoirs published by other children:

http://teacher.scholastic.com/writeit/readwork.asp?Genre=Memoir

 

 

 

Thinking Deeply About Literature!

Written by Kathleen Watt. Posted in 4th Grade

4th grade students are thinking deeply about literature!  As teachers launch the new writing unit on Literary Essays, they are guiding students through the first step in writing, which is to have thoughts and ideas about the texts.  The students are working hard dissecting the texts, by writing down all of their thoughts and questions and then sharing with each other.  The quality of conversation amongst the students is truly impressive!  Students have learned that there are many different ways to have thoughts about a text, such as describing changes, character traits, comparing/contrasting, empathizing, and wondering.  Today, they listened to a short story called “Eleven” by Sandra Cisneros and they were captivated by the story, making comments such as “If I were her, I would not have put on that sweater!” or “I could feel that sweater on my body – gross!”  They are learning to empathize with the characters, as well as describe the character traits and explain their own thinking.   Students are also experimenting with “fancier” language, such as using the words “information, shamed, and admitted,” and they are discussing the difference between inferences, opinions, and facts.  Such high-level thinking will surely produce some outstanding literary critics!

 

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Soccer is the king sport

Written by Elena Pons. Posted in ES PE

 

The unit we were working in December within the Elementary grades was soccer. I can’t tell you how excited are most of your sons/daughters about this unit. They have learned the basic technique to pass, control and kick a ball and are now discovering some basic elements of  tactic strategies.

 

soccer soccer2

More about Geometry!

Written by ShenaK. Posted in 3rd Grade

As the second half of our Geometry unit gets underway, we are now moving from polygons to area.  We will be using arrays as a way to illustrate how area is calculated and lays a perfect foundation for connecting arrays to multiplication, our next Math unit.  Our Geometry unit will end with the “Candy Box Project” in which students will devise ways to arrange candies in a box using as many different configurations they can come up with.

Homelink 15: Adding and Subtracting within 100

Written by ValerieW. Posted in 2nd Grade

Dear Parents,

 

Let’s look at   Adding and Subtracting within 100

In Second Grade we are now working on fluently adding and subtracting within 100 using strategies based on place value and the relationship between addition and subtraction.  We are using many tools to help us.

Our learning targets are:

I can add and subtract numbers within 100 with ease by applying strategies:

  • decomposing numbers into tens and ones
  • using commutative and associative properties
  • using mental strategies

Don’t forget to ask:

How do you know you’re right?

For this week’s problems you will need to use straws and a hundred chart. (See below for an easier way of putting those straws together into bundles!)

For Friday’s activity, Addition Battle, you will need a deck of cards (buy at a stationary shop – – papelería – – or school supply  and toy store such as Abacus

http://abacus.coop/ca/la-cooperativa/botigues-abacus/ .

Type in your zip code – – código postal – – to find nearest shop.).

The Second Grade Team

Decomposing numbers breaking apart numbers so that they can be used more easily in subtraction problems.  For example, 32 could be made and then drawn  as 3 groups of ten and 2 ones, or as 2 groups of ten  and 12 ones.

Commutative property:  you can change numbers around and still get the same answer when you add or multiply.

Examples:
You can change the order  when you add: 3 + 6 = 6 + 3
You can change the order when you multiply: 2 × 4 = 4 × 2

Associative property:  it doesn’t matter how you group the numbers when you add or multiply.

(In other words it doesn’t matter which you calculate first.)

Example addition: (6 + 3) + 4 = 6 + (3 + 4)
Because 9 + 4 = 6 + 7 = 13

Example multiplication: (2 × 4) × 3 = 2 × (4 × 3)
8 × 3 = 2 × 12 = 24

Suggestions for making sets of straws (without buying industrial quantities of them):

–       Buy two or three bags of straws (cheap is fine!)

–       Buy or gather together some rubber bands

–       Take ten straws, put rubber band around them at equidistant points (at middle, at bottom, at top) and then cut the set of ten straws into thirds.  Now you have three groups of ten.

–       Repeat with more groups of ten straws.

–       To make a group of 100, take ten groups of ten, and tie them together with yarn or string.

–       Ones can be made out of straws cut into thirds.

–       If you prefer larger sized manipulatives, just cut straws in half, and not into thirds.

 

 

 

Suggestions for making sets of straws:

–       Buy two bags of straws (cheap is fine!)

–       Buy or gather together some rubber bands

–       Take ten straws, put rubber band around them at equidistant points (at middle, at bottom, at top) and then cut the set of ten straws into thirds.  Now you have three groups of ten.

–       Repeat with more groups of ten straws.

–       To make a group of 100, take ten groups of ten, and tie them together with yarn or string.

–       Ones can be made out of straws cut into thirds.

–       If you prefer larger sized manipulatives, just cut straws in half, and not into thirds.

 

Suggestions for making sets of straws:  

–       Buy two bags of straws (cheap is fine!)

–       Buy or gather together some rubber bands

–       Take ten straws, put rubber band around them at equidistant points (at middle, at bottom, at top) and then cut the set of ten straws into thirds.  Now you have three groups of ten.

–       Repeat with more groups of ten straws.

–       To make a group of 100, take ten groups of ten, and tie them together with yarn or string.

–       Ones can be made out of straws cut into thirds.

–       If you prefer larger sized manipulatives, just cut straws in half, and not into thirds.